A moment of hunger

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https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm+14&version=NRSV

Psalm 14:4 reads, “Have they no knowledge, all those evildoers who eat up my people like bread and do not call upon the Lord?”
And I wonder.
Who are these evildoers? I am inclined to say they are other people, not myself or people that I know.
But verse three tells us, “there is none who does good; no, not one.” So maybe it is me, at those times when I forget to seek God or when He seems out of my reach.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=2+Samuel+11%3A1-15&version=NRSV

In the Old Testament story, there is no doubt that the evildoer is David as we enter into a dark moment in the life of a great leader.

Instead of going into battle against the Ammonites himself, David stays back and sends Joab to do a job that was meant for him. Unfortunately, the Bible doesn’t tell us why he made this choice. Perhaps David was tired and needing some respite, this poet shepherd/king. Whatever the reason, David wasn’t where he belonged, which put him in a situation he wasn’t supposed to be in, which exposed him to temptation he would not have had, which led him to some awful decisions.

I believe there is a longing or hunger that runs through the scripture readings this morning. David, who has lost sight of God and forgotten himself, experiences a hunger. He is hungry and not sure how to have his hunger satisfied.

Hunger plus temptation is a dangerous combination and today’s reading tells a disturbing tale. David has reached a low point where God seems very distant from him. This David is “the David” who, in the service of the Lord, is a musician, a shepherd, a giant slayer, a conqueror, and a King. This is the David who God called “a man after my own heart.”

And David, being where he wasn’t supposed to be, with a feeling of emptiness, sees Bathsheba, another man’s attractive wife, and attempting to satisfy this emptiness takes her for himself. Bathsheba becomes pregnant. Bathsheba is the wife of Uriah, one of David’s loyal and steadfast top commanders. David, in his guilt, is desperate to cover up his terrible choice and sends Uriah home to his wife. When Uriah refuses to leave his men, David sends him to the front ranks of a planned assault to die. Uriah was a good and loyal man who, though he was not born into them, embraced the values of the people of God. Unfortunately, Uriah, a good man, was devoured like bread.

David was hungry but not hungry in the physical sense. Instead, he was spiritually hungry and couldn’t see what he needed, so as soon as temptation presented itself in his weakness, he sought to fill the longing with a woman that did not belong to him.

Think for a minute about the last time you were hungry, so hungry that you could feel it in the pit of your stomach.

Hunger, in the physical sense, is a signal that the body needs fuel. When we eat, we have more energy and more stamina to carry on the activities the day requires.

What David was experiencing here is another type of hunger. A spiritual hunger that sometimes we can also feel in our gut. It is an unsettling indicator that something is missing, but it is less clear what that might be.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=John+6%3A1-21&version=NRSV


In the Gospel reading, five thousand plus people gathered around Jesus to fill this type of hunger. This large crowd had been and continued to follow Jesus, hungry for knowledge and understanding. But, as time passed, Jesus recognized that physical hunger would also need to be addressed.
He chose this opportunity to teach Phillip how when looking to God and trusting, what you need to be satisfied in hunger, will be provided.

Remember David as a boy, too small to wear armor, defeats Goliath with five smooth stones. So we look now at a small boy with five loaves of bread and some fish and whose contribution feeds five thousand in the hands of Jesus. It says that the crowd was satisfied, but this satisfaction did not last long. They were fed spiritually and physically, but now they wanted to make Jesus king.

Wanting is another form of hunger. This hunger is similar to a longing for food and spiritual nourishment. But unlike spiritual and physical hunger, it is not true hunger and cannot be satisfied by the acquisition of what we want.

We, in our weakness, are easily moved by temptations and can find ourselves making poor choices to satisfy these pangs of hunger, especially when we lose sight of who God is and who we are in Christ.

What are you hungry for?
Peace, love, nourishment, understanding?
What are you wanting?

Something to think about, When was the last time you took something that you wanted but did not necessarily belong to you? This question is tricky because we can often justify the taking by convincing ourselves of our need for a particular thing. Understanding the difference between want and need can come from clues that our body gives us. When you have acquired the thing you wanted, did you feel satisfied, are you still uncomfortable, or did your discomfort increase?

I imagine David’s discomfort increased as long as he continued to pursue his wants instead of looking to God for his needs. We all experience wilderness times where our pursuit of God seems unnoticed by him; however, we must remember God is with us and remains with us. Jesus takes the weight of our hunger, reveals to us where our strength comes from, and carries the burden when we give in to our weaknesses and act as an evildoer.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=ephesians+3%3A14-21&version=NRSV

Paul’s letter to the Ephesians tells us that our hunger will be satisfied when we remain in the presence of Jesus. When we know the fullness of God’s love, and we act from a place of abundance. We are enough, and we have enough when we allow Christ to fill our hearts.

And in the words of Paul,
“I pray that you may have the power to comprehend with all the saints, what is the breadth and length and height and depth, and to know the love of Christ that surpasses all knowledge so that you may be filled with all the fullness of God.” Amen.

A moment to dance

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David again gathered all the chosen men of Israel, thirty thousand. David and all the people with him set out and went from Baale-judah, to bring up from there the ark of God, which is called by the name of the Lord of hosts who is enthroned on the cherubim. They carried the ark of God on a new cart, and brought it out of the house of Abinadab, which was on the hill. Uzzah and Ahio, the sons of Abinadab, were driving the new cart with the ark of God; and Ahio went in front of the ark. David and all the house of Israel were dancing before the Lord with all their might, with songs and lyres and harps and tambourines and castanets and cymbals.

So David went and brought up the ark of God from the house of Obed-edom to the city of David with rejoicing; and when those who bore the ark of the Lord had gone six paces, he sacrificed an ox and a fatling. David danced before the Lord with all his might; David was girded with a linen ephod. So David and all the house of Israel brought up the ark of the Lord with shouting, and with the sound of the trumpet. 

As the ark of the Lord came into the city of David, Michal daughter of Saul looked out of the window, and saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord; and she despised him in her heart. 

They brought in the ark of the Lord, and set it in its place, inside the tent that David had pitched for it; and David offered burnt offerings and offerings of well-being before the Lord. When David had finished offering the burnt offerings and the offerings of well-being, he blessed the people in the name of the Lord of hosts, and distributed food among all the people, the whole multitude of Israel, both men and women, to each a cake of bread, a portion of meat, and a cake of raisins. Then all the people went back to their homes.

2 Samuel 6:1-5, 12b-19

King Herod heard of Jesus and his disciples, for Jesus’ name had become known. Some were saying, “John the baptizer has been raised from the dead; and for this reason these powers are at work in him.” But others said, “It is Elijah.” And others said, “It is a prophet, like one of the prophets of old.” But when Herod heard of it, he said, “John, whom I beheaded, has been raised.”

For Herod himself had sent men who arrested John, bound him, and put him in prison on account of Herodias, his brother Philip’s wife, because Herod had married her. For John had been telling Herod, “It is not lawful for you to have your brother’s wife.” And Herodias had a grudge against him, and wanted to kill him. But she could not, for Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him. But an opportunity came when Herod on his birthday gave a banquet for his courtiers and officers and for the leaders of Galilee. When his daughter Herodias came in and danced, she pleased Herod and his guests; and the king said to the girl, “Ask me for whatever you wish, and I will give it.” And he solemnly swore to her, “Whatever you ask me, I will give you, even half of my kingdom.” She went out and said to her mother, “What should I ask for?” She replied, “The head of John the baptizer.” Immediately she rushed back to the king and requested, “I want you to give me at once the head of John the Baptist on a platter.” The king was deeply grieved; yet out of regard for his oaths and for the guests, he did not want to refuse her. Immediately the king sent a soldier of the guard with orders to bring John’s head. He went and beheaded him in the prison, brought his head on a platter, and gave it to the girl. Then the girl gave it to her mother. When his disciples heard about it, they came and took his body, and laid it in a tomb.

Mark 6:14-29

I recently came across an old movie, Signs.  In the movie, the main character is a priest who loses his wife in a bizarre accident.  

Her last words to him seem to be gibberish as she breathes her last breath.

In one of the scenes following her death, the priest is at the dinner table with his brother, son, and daughter. When the brother requests a prayer before dinner. The father, in his brokenness, has lost his faith and says no. He will not pray. The son, who must be around 9 or 10, is afraid of the impending threat of aliens arriving and, in his distress, yells, “I hate you” to his dad.  

The aliens do arrive and wreak havoc on the town and the world. 

In a later scene the father, brother, and the two children are hiding in the basement when the son has an asthma attack threatening his life. The father, in his distressed fear, yells to God, “I hate you.”

Both of these characters felt abandoned, uncared for, and afraid.

In today’s Old Testament scripture, we witness a grand celebration filled with joy. But we are also given a glimpse into the suffering of Michal, who is Davids’s wife. While David is dancing and celebrating during the relocation of the ark, we hear that Michal is watching David dance and despising him in her heart. 

 We only get a small piece of the story in the reading today, so I would like to fill you in on a few details. Saul, Michal’s father, marries Michal to David to protect himself from a possible rebellion. He then sends David into battle, hoping he is killed. David marries Michal to get ahead in life. She was then taken from David and married to another man, who actually loved her, only to be stolen back by David, found to be barren, and basically dismissed. 

David, in this scripture, as he carries the ark of God to its new location, is dancing with pure joy and reckless abandon at the presence of the Lord He shows no regard for his wife’s unhappiness. I imagine Michal was not only embarrassed by David’s display of bizarre dancing but also must have had a great deal of anger at being tossed around like a possession, and taken from the only person who made her feel cherished. Michal’s unhappiness is entirely understandable. But, I wonder, should she resent David’s happiness in the presence of the Lord or his joy at being the chosen king. 

In the reading from Mark, we witness another unhappiness amid dancing and celebration. Herod is consumed with a deadly combination of political fear, family pressure, and public saving face. All this leads him to imprison and kill John the Baptist. He kills the man who is likely the one person in his life who could help him find true happiness.

When I read these readings, I can honestly place myself in both Michal and Herod’s positions. Bitterness and fearfulness have on occasion been the motivational factor in my actions. 

“No man chooses evil because it is evil; he only mistakes it for happiness, the good he seeks.” Mary Wollstonecraft

Deep down, we all desire happiness. And happiness is good. But this is not something to be achieved. Happiness is not something we can pursue or manipulate. 

There is a powerful belief that controlling our environment or ourselves will bring happiness. But often, it is simply the acceptance of what is that makes us happy. Not to say we should never take action or pursue a thing, but that we should not place our happiness at the mercy of our environment. 

My friend Allyson, who some of you know, is a retreat leader in Louisiana.  

She said something to me years ago that I have never forgotten. 

“Never let anyone steal your joy.” Not meaning to protect your happiness at all costs, but I heard in these words that I should never let anyone’s actions steer my heart away from God.

Someone can steal my parking space, the spotlight, my time, or my money. But no one can steal my joy.  

There is a Buddhist philosophy that, It is the patterns of aversions, cravings, and fear that steal our joy.  

By acting in aversion to something, we don’t understand or like, about life circumstances, we imagine we can avoid suffering. But it is the aversion itself that causes the suffering.  

We also think we can avoid suffering by acquiring what we want or protecting that which we have. But, it is not the lack of a thing that makes us unhappy. On the contrary, it is the craving for it and the fear of losing it that causes suffering.

To reduce our suffering, we need to resist trying to acquire and control things while focusing on the goodness and blessings of God. All that appears threatening in life fades into the backdrop when we recognize the presence of God.

In Paul’s letter to the saints in Ephesus, we hear a blessing that, as faithful believers in Christ, should send us out dancing like David. In the Greek text, verses 3-14 are a single sentence. It is the longest and most complex sentence in the bible. I was tempted to add an abbreviated version of it to this teaching. However, I read in a biblical commentary that the complexity of this passage tells us a great deal about the value of our redemption. And I want you to hear it again.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places, just as he chose us in Christ before the foundation of the world to be holy and blameless before him in love. He destined us for adoption as his children through Jesus Christ, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of his glorious grace that he freely bestowed on us in the Beloved. In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses, according to the riches of his grace that he lavished on us. With all wisdom and insight he has made known to us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure that he set forth in Christ, as a plan for the fullness of time, to gather up all things in him, things in heaven and things on earth. In Christ we have also obtained an inheritance, having been destined according to the purpose of him who accomplishes all things according to his counsel and will, so that we, who were the first to set our hope on Christ, might live for the praise of his glory. In him you also, when you had heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation, and had believed in him, were marked with the seal of the promised Holy Spirit; this is the pledge of our inheritance toward redemption as God’s own people, to the praise of his glory.”

Ephesians 1:3-14 NRSV

We are chosen by God not to carry the dwelling place of God, like David. Instead, we are chosen to be the dwelling place of God. We will never be abandoned. We are cherished. We can shout our hatred out to God until we have reached the end of ourselves. And then, I pray, in our exhaustion, we can return to the knowledge of the love of God and dance for joy as we live in his presence.

They shall receive a blessing from the Lord and a just reward from the God of their salvation. Psalm 24:4-5

A moment of teaching

This is an incredible moment in scripture. Jesus, Lord, and teacher, is fully aware that his final moment to convey his most precious message, “Have love for one another,” is here. Jesus has healed and ministered to many, but those in attendance this evening, the evening before his death, would be his closest companions, family, and friends. What an honor to be present at this table. Here we are tonight, followers of Christ stepping back in time participating in this moment.

We at At. Paul’s are a diverse group, and so too was the group around Jesus that night. I would like to introduce you to those Jesus chose to carry the torch of his ministry.

I’ll begin with Andrew. He, once a fisherman, now devotes his life to giving others over to God. He was the first to find Jesus and dragged his older brother, Simon Peter, to him with the words, “I found the Messiah!” When two Greek strangers requested to see Jesus, Andrew brought them to Him. And it was Andrew who brought the child with the fishes and the loaves to Jesus so the crowd could be fed. Andrew was inquisitive, enthusiastic, and resourceful. He teaches others that they are loved and worthy of an introduction to Jesus. Jesus honors the gifts of Andrew as he washes his feet.

Simon, the Zealot, a fisherman, was a bit of a hothead. He has been described as a relentless fisher of men through the power of the Gospel. He is patriotic, loyal, passionate, and sacrificial. He later shared ministry with the apostle Jude and was known to speak on his behalf. Simon teaches us we are not meant to be self-sufficient or without the support of others. Jesus honors his enthusiasm as he washes his feet.

Batholomew mentioned in Matthew, Mark, and Luke is likely the same person known as Nathaneal in John’s Gospel. We know Nathaneal from his question to Phillip, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?.” He is also the one Jesus declared had no deceit in him. He was well-versed in scripture, which Jesus indicates by acknowledging seeing Nathaneal under the fig tree. Nathaneal was honest, skeptical, and faithful. He teaches us to test everything through the scriptures, and we are assured Christ will meet us there. Jesus honors his skepticism as he washes his feet.

James, son of Zebedee, was married with 4 children. He was a temperamental contradiction. He was a solid public speaker though he often had long bouts of silence. James was a well-balanced thinker and planner but, when provoked, had a fiery, vengeful side. As we hear in his request to be at Jesus’s side in His Glory, he was also selfish and conceited. Though slow to grasp the teachings of Jesus, once James understood, he stood firm and courageous when his convictions were challenged. Jesus honors his courage as he washes his feet.

James’ and his younger brother John were called “Sons of Thunder.” John was also a fisherman with a family. He was loving and compassionate but could also be judgemental and selfish as he joined James’ in the request to be beside Jesus in his Glory. John, “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” was reclined next to Jesus at this meal. And it was John that Peter asked to find out who Jesus meant in his words, “Very truly, I tell you, one of you will betray me.” John wrote the Gospel of John, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd John, and Revelation. We learn a great deal from him about the transformational love of God in Christ. Jesus honors his beloved friend as he washes his feet.

There was another James in the mix, and he was known as James the Less. Possibly called the less because he was younger than James, son of Zebedee. He was brother to Matthew, the tax collector, and known for his quiet, reserved personality. Later he will be given the authority to cast out all unclean spirits, raise the dead, and cure disease and sickness. James the Less teaches us that powerful ministry can come quietly. Jesus honors his humility as he washes his feet.

James’ brother Matthew, the tax collector, was once seen as a traitor. Jesus visited Matthew in his home and dined with him and his corrupt friends. After this visit, Matthew gave up his career to follow Jesus. Jesus welcomes sinners and outcasts, and Matthew teaches us, “Happy are those who know their need for God.” Jesus honors Matthew’s need as he washes his feet.

Phillip, well versed in scripture, often took things literally, and this left him confused. It was Phillip who asked Jesus to show them the Father. Jesus replies, “Whoever has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, Show us the Father”? Phillip was practical. When Jesus asked him where to buy bread for the crowd, he responded with “six months wages would not be enough to feed this crowd.” He was also helpful when he informed Jesus that several Greeks were hoping to meet him. Subtlety was lost on Phillip, but we learn that vast knowledge of scripture does not compare to the truth found in Jesus. Jesus honors his seeking as he washes his feet.

Thaddaeus, also known as Jude, was a revolutionary. He was often confused and inquisitive. He was not afraid to ask Jesus how he would reveal himself to his followers and not to the rest of the world. We learn from his question that Jesus will reveal his truths to those who seek him. Jesus honors his curiosity as he washes his feet.

Thomas was inquisitive and also doubtful. He witnesses the miraculous catch of fish and yet will not believe in the resurrection until he sees Jesus himself. Thomas asks Jesus, “How will we know the way when we don’t know where you are going?” Thomas was courageous and faithful as well as literal-minded and desiring of tangible proofs. Jesus honors his courageous expression of doubt as he washes his feet.

Judas was the treasurer for the apostles. He was greedy, deceitful, and treacherous. He criticizes Mary for anointing Jesus with expensive perfume. Judas predestined to betray Jesus has remorse, but his fatal flaw is his inability to receive grace and forgiveness. Though he knows Judas’ heart, Jesus honors his dignity and washes his feet.

Peter, brother to Andrew, was strong-willed, impulsive, fearful, outspoken, and volatile. He was reprimanded by Jesus for his refusal to accept that Jesus would have to die. He attempted to walk toward Jesus on the sea only to be overcome by fear. Jesus knows in advance that Peter will fearfully deny him three times. All this and yet Peter is the “Rock on which Jesus will build his Church.” Peter was prone to error but always came back around. Jesus honors his repentance and washes his feet.

There were others present at that final meal, men and women as witnesses to their Lord’s final teaching on humility and service.


These were the called and the chosen, not because of who they were and what they had done but because of who Jesus was, teacher, teaching the teachable.


Are we teachable?
Can we learn to see the good in ourselves and in others?
Can we relinquish our agendas and join Christ in his mission?


Jesus knew very well how much he was asking of the apostles. He knew how much they would struggle with their differences in character. And he knew they would need to care for each other in his absence.


Can we serve with the heart of Jesus, holding each other up even when challenged by personality differences?
Can we let go of our expectations and encourage others?
Can we promote the unity our Lord prays for?


When we let this moment with our teacher, as servant-Lord sink in deeply, I know we can.

A moment to Yield

In my experience, when things are the most exceptionally challenging, God has the most exceptional response.  Let’s imagine for a moment, you are driving along a road approaching a 4-way intersection.  You know something big is happening because coming toward the intersection on your right is a police car, coming in on the left is an ambulance and coming in straight ahead is a fire truck.  You are likely to get to the intersection first. Do you speed up and get through before the convergence of emergency vehicles or do you yield to allow the response team to get where they need to be.   Of course, we would never want to be in the way of help getting where it is needed, so our job in this picture is to yield.  Now imaging the crisis is in your life, and coming toward the intersection is God, your creator, Jesus, your healer, and the wisdom of the Holy Spirit.  Will you yield?  What does it mean to yield in this context?
 I think it means letting go of our own ideas of what things should look like and trusting each character in our story to give us a glimpse into something bigger.  God promises us if we yield to him in difficulties, he will respond exceptionally.  To yield means to give way.  To yield to God means to give up on our own thoughts of what should and shouldn’t be and allow God to unfold His Glory before our eyes.  
    In the Exodus story, we enter into a tumultuous time where a new king has come into power over Egypt. He is afraid of the Israelites increasing in numbers and imagining them joining forces with Egypt’s enemies and coming up against them.  Pharaoh commands all male babies be put to death.  And, we find ourselves in the story of Moses’ birth. His parents are not named here, but we know from Numbers chapter 26, Moses’ father’s name is Amram, and his mother is Jochebed.  We also know names in the Bible have meaning. The name Jochebed means “Yahweh is Glory.”  I imagine with a name like that your life and all that you do would reflect its meaning. So Amram and Jochebed have a son, and Jochebed sees that he is ‘a fine’ baby. With the pride of a mother, she looks at her young son and sees something more glorious yet to come.  She sees a vision of a future that she must protect.  She is a faithful and intelligent woman, and recognizing that she cannot protect him on her own must entrust him to God.  In this most difficult time, she must trust God’s exceptional response. She gives Moses up, not once but twice.  She gives him up when she places him in the river, and then later, after raising him in his early years, she gives him back to Pharoah’s daughter.  This is a yielding I cannot even imagine, but what a sacrifice to behold.   Often letting go, yielding is how we make way for God’s great response to our difficulties.   Jochebed had a glimpse of something great in this precious child and dared to let go.  
We often think if we hold on tighter to that which we cherish that we can protect it. This idea brings us to the Gospel story, and Peter, who has been with Jesus for quite some time now. Peter has had glimpse after glimpse of God moments, and yet when things get tough, he leaps into the intersection.  Peter in this moment didn’t have a vision of the greatness in God’s response.  Even with all the teaching of his Lord that came before this, he simply didn’t understand. Jesus’ response sounds harsh. “Get back, Satan” This makes me think we must be careful.  If we are not yielding to God, we are yielding to something else.  Maybe we don’t want to think it is satan.  But what are we yielding to?  Fear? Control? Our ideals? Our plans? Our need for security?  We must let loose our expectations, our comforts and yield to God so that God can intervene in ways greater than we have ever seen before, and seeing God’s response, we are liberated to become more than we have ever been before.  
  Moses was a living sacrifice, he bought the Israelites out of the oppression of Egypt.  Jesus was a living sacrifice,  he brought us out of the oppression of sin.  In the yielding to God, greater glory was revealed.
 In Romans 12, we are called to be a living sacrifice to offer ourselves up, yielding our will to God’s.  And we are warned not to think too highly of ourselves.  Not to try to play a more significant role than is ours to play.  I have learned the hard way that when I try to do too much, I miss things and make mistakes.  These mistakes often hurt others.  As a living sacrifice, we are called to do our part and make way for others to do their part, together, we create a bigger picture that, as in the life of Jochebed, can be a reflection of God’s Glory.For Moses to become “the Moses,” who parted the Red Sea.  God needed not only Jochebed; he needed Miriam, Moses’ sister, to do her part.  He needed Pharaoh’s daughter to do hers.  For the Gospel to spread, God needed Peter not to stop the crucifixion but to be the rock on which Christ could build his church.  What is our part in this tumultuous time? What are we called to do, and how are we called to yield.  We will not likely be able to see in our present-day difficulties God’s significant response. Still, we can trust in the glimpses of God and know that if we do our part and give God the right of way, he will respond most exceptionally, and His Glory will be revealed.

Exodus 2 Now a man of the tribe of Levi married a Levite woman, and she became pregnant and gave birth to a son.  When she saw that he was a fine child, she hid him for three months. But when she could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket [a] for him and coated it with tar and pitch.  Then she placed the child in it and put it among the reeds along the bank of the Nile.His sister stood at a distance to see what would happen to him.  Then Pharaoh’s daughter went down to the Nile to bathe, and her attendants were walking along the riverbank. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her female slave to get it.She opened it and saw the baby. He was crying, and she felt sorry for him. “This is one of the Hebrew babies,” she said.  Then his sister asked Pharaoh’s daughter, “Shall I go and get one of the Hebrew women to nurse the baby for you?”  “Yes, go,” she answered. So the girl went and got the baby’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you.” So the woman took the baby and nursed him. 10 When the child grew older, she took him to Pharaoh’s daughter and he became her son. She named him Moses,[b] saying, “I drew him out of the water.”

Romans 12 Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship. Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing, and perfect will.  For by the grace given me I say to every one of you: Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you. For just as each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we, though many, form one body, and each member belongs to all the others. We have different gifts, according to the grace given to each of us. If your gift is prophesying, then prophesy in accordance with your [a] faith; if it is serving, then serve; if it is teaching, then teach; if it is to encourage, then give encouragement; if it is giving, then give generously; if it is to lead,[b] do it diligently; if it is to show mercy, do it cheerfully.

Matthew 16  13 When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say the Son of Man is?”14 They replied, “Some say John the Baptist; others say Elijah; and still others, Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”15 “But what about you?” he asked. “Who do you say I am?”16 Simon Peter answered, “You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.”17 Jesus replied, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah, for this was not revealed to you by flesh and blood, but by my Father in heaven. 18 And I tell you that you are Peter,[b] and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades[c] will not overcome it. 19 I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be[d] bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be[e] loosed in heaven.” 20 Then he ordered his disciples not to tell anyone that he was the Messiah.21 From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life.22 Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him. “Never, Lord!” he said. “This shall never happen to you!”23 Jesus turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”